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Home For Researchers Research Projects CROSS-CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN SELF-PROMOTION: ANTECEDENTS

CROSS-CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN SELF-PROMOTION: ANTECEDENTS

Research Projects

People make the fundamental attribution error. People make the self-serving bias error. They tend to perceive their effort and contributions bigger than how it is perceived by others. They overestimate own contribution and underestimate contributions of others. Sometimes this is done consciously to impress their bosses and friends. Sometimes our own work simply looms larger and more significant than it really is.

However, people vary in the degree of overestimating their own contributions: some overestimate a lot and are very self-promoting, and others are more modest and tend to see their own contributions at the level similar to the perceptions of others.

The asymmetry in self vs. peer evaluations can have profound effects on team dynamics and outcomes. Differences in self vs. peer evaluations can lead to conflicts, misunderstandings, increased team membership turnover, and ultimately reduced performance.

Big Questions:

Who is more likely to self-promote?

  • Demographics?
  • Culture?
  • Cultural differences and separation in time and space?
  • Technical skills and other visible differences on attributes that are likely contributing to performance?

What effects asymmetries in peer vs. self-evaluations have on team dynamics and performance?

  • More conflicts?
  • Less satisfaction?
  • Higher turnover?
  • Lower performance?

Method:

The study is based on a comparison of self vs. peer evaluations.

Personal and team characteristics, as well as team dynamics and performance data are used to answer these questions.

Lead author: Vas Taras